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Drug War Chronicle, Issue #630 -(urls + editorial)- 4/30/10

Von: B Sellers (bliss@sfo.com) [Profil]
Datum: 30.04.2010 18:40
Message-ID: <hrf16h$ecf$1@news.eternal-september.org>
Followup-to: talk.politics.drugs
Newsgroup: talk.politics.drugs rec.drugs.psychedelic rec.drugs.misc alt.hemp alt.drugs
Drug War Chronicle, Issue #630 -- 4/30/10
Phillip S. Smith, Editor, psmith@drcnet.org
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630

A Publication of Stop the Drug War (DRCNet)
David Borden, Executive Director, borden@drcnet.org
"Raising Awareness of the Consequences of Drug Prohibition"

2010 is Important in Drug Policy -- And So Are You:
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/changing_minds_laws_lives_2010

Table of Contents:

1. FEATURE: REED COLLEGE IN THE CROSSHAIRS OF PROSECUTORIAL DRUG CRACKDOWN
Reed College in Portland, Oregon, has a decades-old reputation for
rigorous academics and counterculture values. Now, after two Reed
students died of heroin overdoses in two years, state and federal
prosecutors are lowering the boom, starting with this weekends' annual
end of school-year party.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/reed_college_prosecutors_crack_down_heroin_overdos
e_renn_fayre_drugs

2. FEATURE: FIRST DRUG USER UNION FORMS IN SAN FRANCISCO
San Francisco has become only the second city in America to host a drug
user union, after New York City. But the movement is spreading
internationally.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/san_francisco_drug_user_union

3. APPEAL: 2010 IS IMPORTANT IN DRUG POLICY -- AND SO ARE YOU
2010 is a critical year in the effort to end prohibition and the war on
drugs. The StoptheDrugWar.org (DRCNet) "Changing Minds, Changing Laws,
Changing Lives" campaign is asking for you to pitch in -- your support
is more important now than it has ever been before!
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/changing_minds_laws_lives_2010

4. MEDICAL MARIJUANA: NJ PATIENT JOHN WILSON FREED ON APPEAL BOND,
LAWMAKERS CALL FOR PARDON
MS sufferer John Wilson walked out of a New Jersey prison Thursday, free
on appeal for growing 17 plants last summer. A month after he was
sentenced in December, New Jersey became the 14th medical marijuana
state. Now, there is a renewed effort to win a pardon for him.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/new_jersey_medical_marijuana_patient_john_wilson_f
ree_bail_bond

5. LATIN AMERICA: MEXICO DRUG WAR UPDATE
No letup in Mexico's prohibition-related violence this week, with
another 208 killings to add to the toll.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/mexico_drug_war_update

6. PROHIBITION: MORE DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT MEANS MORE VIOLENCE,
META-STUDY FINDS
If you want to reduce "drug-related" violence, sending in more cops and
cracking down harder is exactly the wrong thing to do, a review of 20
years worth of studies has concluded.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/icsdp_study_drug_law_enforcement_violence

7. PAIN MEDICINE: KANSAS DOCTOR AND WIFE GO ON TRIAL IN "PILL MILL" CASE
For five years, Dr. Stephen Schneider and his wife, Linda, operated a
pain management clinic in Haysville, Kansas. Now, they are on trial as
drug dealers in a federal prosecution that revisits the ongoing conflict
between the imperatives of pain treatment and those of drug law enforcement.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/pain_doctor_trial_stephen_schneider_kansas

8. LAW ENFORCEMENT: THIS WEEK'S CORRUPT COPS STORIES
A New York cop heads to prison for dealing dope and groping women, a
pair of Texas cops land in hot water, and California seems to have
something of a problem with its drug lab techs.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/police_drug_corruption

9. MEDICAL MARIJUANA: STUDY BILL MOVES FORWARD IN TENNESSEE
Medical marijuana in Tennessee?!?! Well, not this year, but a plan to
form a study group for next year is gaining ground.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/tennessee_medical_marijuana_study_bill_passes_hous
e_committee

10. PARAPHERNALIA: FLORIDA LEGISLATURE PASSES BILL BANNING BONG SALES
If you're in Florida and you're a fan of pipes or bongs, it's time to
stock up. They're going to be hard to find for sale in the Sunshine
State in the near future. Marijuana use is expected to decrease as a
result (just kidding).
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/florida_bill_bans_bong_sales

11. ENGLAND: ROYAL COLLEGE OF NURSING LEADER CALLS FOR PRESCRIPTION
HEROIN BY THE NHS
The leader of Britain's largest nurses' union has called for prescribing
heroin to addicts through the National Health Service. His union debated
the issue this week, but made no decision.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/england_nurse_union_head_says_prescribe_heroin

12. WEEKLY: THIS WEEK IN HISTORY
Events and quotes of note from this week's drug policy events of years past.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/drug_war_history

13. WEEKLY: BLOGGING @ THE SPEAKEASY
"A New Marijuana Legalization Campaign," "Florida Cops Repeatedly Arrest
Quadriplegic for Medical Marijuana," "If You Kids Don't Quit Partying,
We'll Prosecute Your College," "Banning Pot Didn't Work, So Let's Try
Banning Bongs," "DC's Medical Marijuana Law Needs Your Support Now,"
"Will Medical Marijuana Lead to Full Legalization?," "How to Build a
Movement," "Will DEA Help States Implement Medical Marijuana Laws?"
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/blogging_at_the_speakeasy

14. FEEDBACK: DO YOU READ DRUG WAR CHRONICLE?
Do you read Drug War Chronicle? If so, we need your feedback to evaluate
our work and make the case for Drug War Chronicle to funders. We need
donations too.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/do_you_read_drug_war_chronicle

15. STUDENTS: INTERN AT STOPTHEDRUGWAR.ORG (DRCNET) AND HELP STOP THE
DRUG WAR!
Apply for an internship at DRCNet and you could spend a semester
fighting the good fight!
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/drcnet_internships_to_stop_the_drug_war

(Not subscribed? Visit http://stopthedrugwar.org to sign up today!)

===============

1. Feature: Reed College in the Crosshairs of Prosecutorial Drug Crackdown
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/630/reed_college_prosecutors_crack_down_heroin_overdos
e_renn_fayre_drugs

While Oregon sees hundreds of drug overdose deaths a year -- from both
illegal and prescription drugs -- a pair of publicity-seeking state and
federal prosecutors have made a small Portland liberal arts college
where two students have died of heroin overdoses in the past two years
the public focus of their attack on the drug trade. Last week, Reed
College (http://www.reed.edu) President Colin Diver was summoned to the
federal courthouse in downtown Portland, where he was warned that the
school could face a cutoff of federal funds, including student loans, if
it is not found to be taking "adequate steps to combat illegal drug
activity," starting with this weekend's annual school year-end bash,
Renn Fayre (http://www.rennfayre.com), which the prosecutors vowed will
be filled with undercover police determined to quash drug use and sales.

According to the Oregon State Medical Examiner
(http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SME/docs/Drug_Related_Death_Report_2009.pdf),
119 people died from heroin overdoses in 2008 and 127 in 2009. Including
prescription drug overdoses, 492 Oregonians died of ODs in 2008, 270
from prescription opiates. For some reason, the State Medical Examiner
did not include prescription drug deaths in the 2009 figures.

In Multnomah County alone, where Reed is located, 63 people died of
heroin overdoses in 2008 and 71 in 2009. That's more than one a week for
both years. But no other single overdose or pair of overdose deaths has
excited the reaction displayed by state and federal prosecutors who went
after Reed last week.

Reed makes an excellent target for drug warriors. For decades, the
academically rigorous school has had a reputation as a counterculture
haven where drug use is accepted. While that reputation is overblown and
outdated, students say, it makes the college a handy lightning rod for
those engaged in the culture wars.

Enter US Attorney for Oregon Dwight Holton and Multnomah County
(Portland) District Attorney Michael Schrunk. In an email to Divers that
they asked be forwarded to the Reed community, the prosecutorial pair
used the deaths of the two students as a battle cry for a crackdown.

After lamenting the loss of the students, they wrote: "But while now may
be a time for reflection and grief, it is also a time for action. It is
now time for the Reed community to abandon the myth that drug use is a
safe and acceptable form of exploration. It is time for Renn Fayre and
Reed to adopt a zero tolerance policy prohibiting illegal drugs flat-out."

It isn't beatnik days anymore, prosecutors wrote, in a bid to appeal to
Reed's countercultural heritage: "The illegal drug trade has changed
radically since the days when giants like Alan (sic) Ginsberg and Gary
Snyder '51 roamed campus here. The fact is that the drug trade is now
fueled by one of the most potent forces in the West: greed."

The pair then explained at length how "drug cartels" are "targeting
middle class and wealthier kids," then went on to say they made no
distinction between non-lethal drug like marijuana and drugs like
heroin. "Don't get sucked in by this bogus Siren call. The fact is that
if the Reed community insists that this is 'not our problem' and tries
to draw distinctions between 'hard' and other drugs, you will send the
message that drug use can be safe... It is time for the Reed community
to embrace the notion that drug use is not safe and it will not be
tolerated -- without fine print, without provisos, and without conditions."

They then issued a blunt warning: "As the top federal prosecutor in
Oregon and the Multnomah County District attorney, we have a
responsibility to this community -- including you and your families. We
cannot, and we will not stand by if drug use is tolerated on your
campus. We cannot, and we will not stand by if Renn Fayre is a repeat of
years past -- where even in the wake of Alejandro Lluch's death drug use
and distribution were allegedly rampant."

Finally, the prosecutorial pair gallantly offered their assistance: "We
stand ready to help in any way we can. If need be, we will use all the
tools available to us in federal and state law enforcement. We owe that
to the people of our community, including you."

A suitably cowed President Diver responded with his own email
(http://insidehighered.com/content/download/345861/4299206/version/1/file/reed+e-mail.doc)
to the Reed community: "My message regarding drug use at Renn Fayre 2010
is very simple: Do not use illegal drugs. That means no marijuana,
hallucinogens, designer drugs, cocaine, amphetamines, opiates, or other
illegal substances."

Diver said he got a forceful and direct message from the prosecutors:
"Shut down illegal drug use and distribution at Reed College, starting
with Renn Fayre. Based on ongoing criminal investigations, including
conversations with current and former students and other sources, these
officials have heard numerous allegations about drug use at Reed, and
particularly at Renn Fayre."

Diver also mentioned the threats he received: "In the course of the
conversation, the US Attorney pointedly referred to a federal statute
that makes it a criminal and civil offense for anyone knowingly to
operate any facility for the purpose of using illegal drugs. We were
also reminded of federal legislation that allows all federal funding --
including student loans -- to be withdrawn from any college or
university that fails to take adequate steps to combat illegal drug
activity."

On Wednesday, Diver was forced to clarify. According to Inside Higher
Education News
(http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/04/28/qt/reed_clarifies_what_the_u_s_attorney_sai
d),
the US Attorney only cited the federal crack house statute, under which
Reed could face large fines, not the Drug-Free Schools Act, which is the
statute that could impact student loans, Diver said. While the US
Attorney "referred to federal legislation that could be applied to the
college if it failed to crack down more forcefully," he never cited the
Drug-Free Schools Act, Diver conceded.

In his email to the Reed community, Diver also delivered a more
immediate warning: "We have been told that, during next weekend's Renn
Fayre celebration, undercover Portland police officers will be
circulating on campus, uniformed Portland police officers will be on
alert to respond immediately to calls, and prosecutors stand ready to
process criminal charges."

The prosecutorial shakedown has stirred controversy both on campus and
in the broader Portland community, with many defending Reed's students,
while others say the "druggies" need to be brought under control. In any
case, Reed's reputation has complicated its relations with law enforcement.

"There's always a market here for a 'Reed is strange and weird' story,"
Bear Wilner-Nugent, a Reed alumnus, one-time director of Renn Fayre, and
Portland criminal lawyer told USA Today
(http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2010-04-26-ihe-drugs-reed_N.htm)
this week. "I think it's going to scare students using drugs to be more
underground. I think it's going to discourage students from seeking help
for drug problems. It's a waste of resources on what is a tiny
fingernail clipping in the drug problem," he said. "It's showboating."

Wilner-Nugent will be attending Renn Fayre again this year, and he said
it compares favorably with end-of-semester parties at other schools.
"There's a less macho attitude to it, there is less drinking and so you
don't see the sexual harassment compared to other institutions," he
said. "They are busting one of the saner and healthier college parties
in the nation."

"This is the first time any college president has been threatened with
the loss of federal funding because of campus drug use, so that's pretty
interesting," said Jon Perri, West Coast coordinator for Students for
Sensible Drug Policy (http://www.ssdp.org). "We need to be criticizing
those prosecutors, as well as law enforcement, for sending in undercover
agents and spreading misinformation about drug dealers coming in to
target rich white kids. And we need to keep after Reed President Divers,
who after his sit-down with prosecutors, basically said don't do illegal
drugs, then mentioned a long list of drugs that doesn't include alcohol,
which does more harm," Perri pointed out.

"Our chapter there is actively participating in the planning for Renn
Fayre, and they will be waging a Good Samaritan policy campaign, while
the feds are coming in and trying to do the same old stuff," Perri.
"Reed SSDP is trying to pitch it as instead of trying to increase
penalties, try something that will save lives."

Perri said he worked with students at Reed to reactivate the Good
Samaritan campaign after the second student death. Good Samaritan
policies allow drug overdose victims or their friends to seek help
without fear of arrest, or, in the case of colleges, academic
discipline. "I encouraged them to get it back up and running," he said.
"They were wary of starting a campaign because they didn't want to be
seen as politicizing those kids' deaths, but that's what the prosecutors
have now done."

While by all accounts there has been drug use at Renn Fayre in past
years, it is a much milder, less raucous event than many end-of-year
campus parties, with a penchant for hallucinogens -- not heroin -- and
an abundance of weed. Renn Fayre also features full-body human chess,
softball tournaments, a great feast, and lots of music. And alcohol for
those over 21.

"Everyone here fears that come Saturday there could be mass arrests for
marijuana possession and underage drinking," said Reed SSDP chapter head
McKenzie Warren. "It some senses, it's not totally surprising because
there has been a lot of local press aimed at Reed, but there is a lot of
worry," she reported. "ODs happen all the time, but the homeless
population isn't going to get the same focus as a well-known private
liberal arts college," said Warren. "Over the years, Reed earned a
reputation as a crazy drug-taking school. Maybe it once was, way back in
the 1970s, but these days the reputation outstrips the reality."

Reed SSDP is working with other campus groups to protect students from
the tender ministrations of law enforcement, Warren said. "We have a
number of groups working on harm reduction this weekend, we've had a
Reed alumni who is a lawyer come and give talks on how to deal with the
police, especially with respect to dorm rooms, and we printed up 1,500
ACLU know your rights cards. We've also been putting up flyers and posters."

And it will push for a full-fledged Good Samaritan policy. "We have only
half a Good Samaritan policy," said Warren. "The school just adopted a
new implementation plan for our drug policy, and it differentiates pot
and alcohol from harder drugs. There is a Good Samaritan policy for
alcohol and marijuana, but not for harder drugs. The administration is
trying to crack down."

A Good Samaritan policy for alcohol makes sense; for marijuana, the need
for it is much less. But a Good Samaritan policy that excludes the drugs
that are most likely to kill people doesn't make much sense. There is
work to be done at Reed, and the Good Samaritan battle looks like a good
way to counter the weight of the prosecutorial offensive.

===============
...

___________________

It's time to correct the mistake:
truth:the Anti-drugwar
<http://www.briancbennett.com>

Cops say legalize drugs--find out why:
<http://www.leap.cc>

Stoners are people too:
<http://www.cannabisconsumers.org>
___________________


later
bliss -- Cacoa  Powered... (at sfo dot com)

--
bobbie sellers - a retired nurse in San Francisco

"It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.
It is by the beans of cacoa that the thoughts acquire speed,
the thighs acquire girth, the girth become a warning.
It is by theobromine alone I set my mind in motion."
--from Someone else's Dune spoof ripped to my taste.
















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